Living with Conviction in 2017

The Scriptures Are Absolutely Truthful and Trustworthy

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Dictionaries close out each year by choosing a word of the year. This year these words were chosen by various influential dictionaries: post-truth (Oxford), surreal (Merriam-Webster), and xenophobia (dictionary.com). In a twist to this tradition, I am proposing a word for the upcoming year. My choice is a word that has been bouncing around in my mind for a little while. That word is conviction. It is a word previous generations of believers used on a regular basis. Perhaps we use it less today because we have become less convictional in our faith and living.

Concierge 2016

The Top Ten Articles for the Year

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As we end the year which is 2016, we take a look back to some of the articles on this blog. These ten articles are the top ten written this year. It is worth noting that some articles from previous years continue to be found by quite a few readers.

The Missing Ingredient in Many Americans Thanksgiving

To Whom Are You Thankful?

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Cooks in kitchens all across America will find themselves gathering all of the ingredients necessary for their favorite Thanksgiving Day recipes. Many will rely upon the traditional recipes handed down for generations. The biggest challenge is not to forget a key ingredient for that favorite dish. A missing ingredient determines whether diners consume the dish or you place it in the leftover container.

Laying R.I.P. to Rest

Reformation21.org
October 25, 2016

Nick Batzig makes a strong case for understanding death from a biblical or Christian perspective. Too many believers use R.I.P. when someone famous dies without regard for what it means to rest in peace. In a similar fashion, far too many employ the letters OMG in casual conversation. It should never be a casual thing to toss out a reference to God. Look at how Batzig states the issue.

I’ve noticed something of a concerning trend over the past several years. It is the way in which believers speak about culture-impacting individuals at their deaths. Instead of simply expressing appreciation for their life and achievements, it has become commonplace for Christians to use the shorthand R.I.P. (“rest in peace”) on social media when speaking of individuals–in whose lives there was no evidence of saving grace–at their death. At the risk of sounding ill-tempered, I wish to set out several reasons why I am troubled by this occurrence.

The author provides three compelling reasons fro his concern and offers wise counsel on how Christians should think and speak of the death of others. Click over and read the article.